It’s the beginning of a new year, and retrospectives are totally a thing. 2013 featured the ten-year anniversary of my high school graduation, which has had me thinking about the last ten years.

This year saw the launch of a Kickstarter campaign to fund my next webcomic — and I have high hopes not only for 2014, but pretty much the rest of my life.

Why?

– In 2003, I was doodling pictures of characters for my comic To Hell, and I was writing Invader ZIM fan fiction. I had come up with a list of titles for stories in the To Hell series, based on a relatively obscure joke in the title of the work itself — referencing the postal system, mostly.

– The work placement program I was in, which had helped me to earn the credits I needed to finish high school because I had started “circling the drain” ultimately failed to place me in a job when the graphic design firm I was interning with cut me a check and sent me on my way.

– I met with a member of the high school administration staff in charge of discipline about a “Saturday School” disciplinary thingy that potentially meant I wouldn’t graduate. I pointed out the disciplinary thing was from 2002 (my junior year), and that I had served it at the end of the previous year.

– I graduated high school quite handily, despite nearly failing several classes. I accumulated enough credits that the entire second half of my senior year, I left school at lunch. I applied to a community college because I had no idea what I wanted to do. I took acting, philosophy, psychology, and graphic design.

– I joined a gaming group and started playing Dungeons & Dragons. I failed most of my college classes, with the exception of the psychology class which I was very interested in — and the acting class because there was no homework.


A lot of stuff happened that year, some of which would haunt me for years — failing several classes sent me into a quasi-spiritual quest of self-evaluation. Despite failing philosophy, I had a context in which to explore my beliefs. My psychology class encouraged me to confront my mortality.