“It is Hestia, to whom I offer my prayer, She Who Tends The Hearth And Watches Over The Entryway. It is through Hestia we are granted the power to light the way for others — to bring them home. It is through Hestia we are granted the power to protect those who take shelter around our fires — to keep them safe. It is through Hestia we are granted the power to restore health and livelihood to those under our care — to keep them coming home.”

“I do not act alone.” (Nor do any of us.) “I do not enact my will.” (Nor do any of us.) “I do not take for myself.” (Nor do any of us.) “I do not represent Hestia.” (Nor do any of us.) “Nor does She represent me.” (Nor does She any of us.)

There’s a bit of text from the beginning of Complete Divine that talks about the things that set a divine character apart from other characters — that devotion to an authority or an ideal is central to the concept of a divine character. That it isn’t just the belief in the existence of such a thing, but the belief in its worth. Belief that an intangible and imperceptible force has value.

It sort of messes things up when the gods can be seen, touched, and talked to — one of the things that’s kind of weird about games like Dungeons & Dragons, where magical powers are actually granted to characters for use doing … well, just about anything. There’s an implication that if your character receives power from their god, that they’re doing right by their god. I might well be missing an important point.